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THE DOPPLER

The Doppler podcasts cover all things cloud while focusing on how to prepare the traditional enterprise to look beyond conventional computing. We talk about what’s new, what’s working, and have expert guests who provide the advice you need to be successful in the cloud. Read by over 10,000 IT leaders, The Doppler weekly email reports and quarterly print editions answer your critical cloud questions and keep you informed on the cloud trends that matter most. For more information please visit cloudtp.com/doppler
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Now displaying: July, 2017
Jul 27, 2017
Our guest on the podcast this week is Rob Kaloustian, VP, WW Technical Services at Commvault.
 

We discuss the different capabilities of Commvault, from cloud data management to cloud automation, Ransomare protection, and beyond. Essentially, they make data less costly to move to the cloud. They are different from competitors based on their scaleability, indexing, deep metadata search, deep content search, and high security capabilities.

Ultimately, large enterprises want to diversify where their data is stored. This physical diversity provides better protection for them by giving them contingency plans if something goes wrong. At first, large enterprises are concerned with having their data in the public cloud at all. Once they warm up to public cloud, they look to build multiple backups of their data in different places so that if it fails in one place it is still protected and functioning somewhere else.

Jul 20, 2017

Our guest on the podcast this week is Jonathon Hensley, CEO at Emerge Interactive.

We discuss how Jonathan built Emerge Interactive from a technology advisory services company in 1998 and evolved it to a full service digital experience company. They are focused on how to make the most use of technology for clients. To this day, they offer advisory services to come in and help enterprises develop a digital roadmap and product plan and determine how they’ll invest in that over the next 5-10 years. They also do a lot of user experience work. They help clients develop a solution and either implement it or hand it off to an internal team to build. Building the company and launching any career in technology takes a lot of hard work and long hours. At the beginning, it takes doing a lot of work for free to break in, from speaking gigs to advising companies. It’s important to always keep up with trends and read the news because awareness is everything. You should be constantly learning. When you are passionate about something like technology, learning is not work and becomes part of everything you do.

How do you keep organizations on track with what they need instead of chasing trends and new buzzwords? We discuss avoiding buzzword bingo so enterprises can focus on what performance you are trying to enable with technology and what outcome enterprises are looking for with each effort. Compatibility and maintainability are also crucial to consider when looking at implementing new technologies in an enterprise. Enterprises need to peel back layers to understand what the life cycle is to this technology and what needs to be done.

Jul 14, 2017

Our guests on the podcast this week are Lynda Stadtmueller, Vice President, Cloud Services at Frost & Sullivan and Kelly Ireland, Founder and CEO at CB Technologies.

We discuss why hybrid cloud and change management are still important for companies in the second decade of modern cloud. With the exception of some startups born in the cloud, many enterprises never accepted the fact that the cloud would replace the data center. Organizations feel this is not an “or” discussion, it’s an “and” discussion. They know things need to be on the public cloud, and they need their own on-premises data center as well. Therefore, enterprises sift through their workloads and data to determine what makes sense to migrate to public cloud and what makes sense to keep on private cloud. CTP has found that 30-40% of workloads are not economically viable to move to the public cloud. Organizations can build net new applications on the cloud, but they shouldn’t move everything. For this reason, hybrid cloud will continue to be a strong focus for enterprises in the future.

How will the cloud change IT within companies? 

Businesses are now technology dependent. Every aspect of how a business operates is becoming technology-based. The technology allows a new way for enterprises to innovate and with that, a need for IT organizations to transform. Separate from the need to understand what the cloud is and how to optimize it, these IT teams must also draw on new skill sets professionally. IT organizations are struggling with how to become a customer service-oriented organization to internal line of business clients. 53% of companies are concerned about the changing roles of IT employees. There is a lot of change management that is required that has nothing to do with the technology, but more to do with how it’s delivered to the business.

Jul 6, 2017

Our guest on the podcast this week is Brian Gracely, Director of Product Strategy at Red Hat.

Brian discusses a small bank in Ohio and how they have a business use-case for Kubernetes. Because Kubernetes was built to manage Google-sized technology, it is surprising that there is a reason to apply it to a small brick and mortar bank just starting with web and mobile. What they noticed in the switch is that because customers get paid on Fridays and are more likely to check if they got paid on their personal mobile device, as soon as they launched mobile their Friday traffic soared. For just one fifth of business days, Fridays received ten times the amount of traffic as any other day. This unexpected spiky traffic pattern was a great use-case for Kubernetes. Kubernetes was built to deal with problems like that, even at small businesses.

We also look at the state of the big three orchestration engines: Kubernetes, Mesos, and Swarm. Kubernetes and Mesos began as internal projects from larger companies. Mesos began in 2014 as a container scheduler Twitter was  using to manage its own containers. They released it as open-source, so a community began to form around that. It focused on big data elements because of their applications to Twitter. To this day, Mesos is still preferred to run big data applications compared to the other two. Kubernetes began as Google’s Borg technology, used internally then released open-source. It was focused on the 80/20 type of use-cases such as batch use-cases and container use-cases. What happens when open-source solutions are released is that the community flocks to one and Kubernetes won more of the community than any solution. With a strong community, Kubernetes is better suited to work with many different types of applications. Last, Docker came out with Swarm to compete in the market. They keep things as simple as possible to get a few containers clustered together. Swarm has evolved to work mostly around Docker’s data center products. Tracking this industry over time reveals how containers have evolved to having use-cases in enterprises of all sizes.

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